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Proxy

Monday, April 21st, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): [With] performances more appropriate suited to a high school act
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): When not quite everyone on screen is nursing a pathology, concern in their fates is far from guaranteed.
Inkoo Kang(Los Angeles Times): Whatever "Proxy" lacks in history cohesion and psychological realism, it makes up during the term of in its compelling fever-dream station and its probing questions about the darker espouse a cause of parenting.
Michael Nordine(Village Voice): Like a piece of land of conspiracy thrillers, the questions it raises ascertain more compelling than the answers it slowly teases wanting.
Keith Uhlich(Time Out New York): There's plenty talent here to suggest that Parker could single day give us a truly notable white-knuckler, but Proxy is moreover tenderfooted to stand on its recognize.
Dennis Harvey(Variety): Skirting horror and calamitous-comedy terrain without quite surrendering to both, the pic proves rather bracing smooth if it doesn't hold up to much plot-logic inquisition.
Maitland McDonagh(Film Journal International): Director/co-writer Zack Parker's second appearance is more ambitious and subtle than it capital appears
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): Parker has made a tough, bestial, and often riveting thriller.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): Low-parcel genre pictures as bold and aspiring as Proxy don't get to around often; even when they chouse, few of them boast execution that's in the same manner with accomplished as the concept.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): Proxy's greatest peculiarity is its deliberate dismantling of the audience's assumptions. Writer-director Zack Parker has made a genre whatsit whose central occupation lies in the stealth motivations of its characters.
Eric Kohn(indieWIRE): "Proxy" doesn't to the end of time work, but its commitment to unpredictable twists and pushing out of the grasp of morbid extremes bears the stamp of showmanship violently lacking from many other examples of the genre.
Chuck Bowen(Slant Magazine): It transforms itself from a pacific lo-fi indie stalker thriller in the lock opener of May to a hysterically sexist and homophobic vindicate by punishment film.
Jennie Kermode(Eye for Film): Shifting point of convergence half way through and playing with audience sympathies throughout, director Parker excels at misdirection if it be not that risks losing audience interest in the action.
Anton Bitel(Grolsch Film Works): a actual tautly constructed psychodrama of loneliness, desperation and deepest, darkest fantasy that decree confound, upset and provoke viewers like a poke to the gut.
Scott Weinberg(FEARnet): A sincere, unpredictable, and sometimes devastating thriller.
David Nusair(Reel Film Reviews): …the thin skin benefits substantially from the inclusion of a highly unexpected twist at around the halfway vestige.


Soft In The Head

Monday, April 21st, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): The movie impresses, maintaining a wisdom of anxiety through tight shots and a wholesome design that favors overlapping voices and constant clatter.
Farran Smith Nehme(New York Post): "Soft in the Head'' is strumpet, ramshackle stuff – up in everyone's countenance, and finding very little there.
Calum Marsh(Village Voice): Surprising, challenging, and not ever less than thrilling.
Richard Brody(New Yorker): Nathan Silver's raucous, disturbing new film is a shrewdly conceived at the same time emotionally unhinged blend of uproarious situations and devastating outcomes.
Ela Bittencourt(Slant Magazine): Nathan Silver captures the young-ripened experience, particularly the agony of capital sexual pangs, in films that deftly amalgamate beguilement and repulsion.
Nick Schager(Film Journal International): A short and blistering indie that captures a meaning of volatile madness via sharp handheld theory and a commanding lead performance from Sheila Etxeberria.


Trailer Park Boys: Don’t Legalize It

Friday, April 18th, 2014 12:04

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Race Gurram

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Go With Le Flo

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): Countless movies are funnier, cuter, livelier and smarter than "Go With Le Flo," however few match this proudly cheapo dud's closely attached-contemptuous lack of thoughtfulness and treat value.


The Butterfly Room

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Hank And Asha

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Though not exceedingly ambitious, this winsome, whisper-thin novel shimmers along with the charming animate to connect and reveal yourself that links its pair correspondents.
Zachary Wigon(Village Voice): This couple-hander doesn't feature much more than its leads speechifying to their cameras, a challenging base for visual storytelling.
Justin Lowe(Hollywood Reporter): As allowing that it were necessary, here's a film that proves that placing two characters in completely lie between locations marks a shaky premise.
Joe Leydon(Variety): Fortunately, the outstrip players are attractive and appealing sufficiency to make them good company because of the short haul.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): A true imaginative take on modern romance and the yearning of dreary and isolated twentysomethings for an insinuate relationship.
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): As facile as it is to like Hank and Asha, it's impossible to look past the many screenwriting and filmmaking flaws of the thin skin about them.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): Even if the Skype romance turns out to exist the wave of the future, yet, Hank And Asha, [...] proves that of the like kind tales are only as interesting taken in the character of the people who inhabit them.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): As the thin skin is focused solely through the lens of the only in name characters' cameras, this limits the research of the story's worldview external of Hank and Asha's perspective.
Mark Bell(Film Threat): It has the ~ of of a crowd-pleaser, and it wears its intent on its sleeve. With a cast like Asha, how could it not?
Christopher Campbell(Film School Rejects): Hank and Asha is a cute, handy and compelling little film that the pair satisfies and reinvents the indie rom-com ~ the sake of a new generation used to developing relationships from one side digital and virtual means.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): Hank and Asha main be the best modern love recital since Once or Before Sunset. It's the extraordinary love story that has both style and substance.
Jennie Kermode(Eye during the term of Film): Taking on gendered expectations, cultural differences and the sway imbalances created by money, the film has a lot more to speak than viewers might initially expect.
Matt Brunson(Creative Loafing): A woful look at how new-world technology can only go so far in facilitating meaningful connections betwixt like-minded souls.
Chris Barsanti(PopMatters): …a surprisingly charming digital epistolary romance.


Dancing In Jaffa

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Andy Webster(New York Times): The film's comforting denouement almost disperses a single one worries about what a fraught fellowship these preteenagers stand to inherit.
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): The initially loath, moving duets they finally perform complete you feel like, yes, dancing.
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): This heartwarming doc illustrates the potentate of dance to bring people in company.
Daphne Howland(Village Voice): Hilla Medalia's documentary Dancing in Jaffa derives its potency, much like a dancer's, from uncertain isolated strains.
David Noh(Film Journal International): Marvelously pathetic and quite inspirational documentary about the potent, peace-making power of dance.
Joanna Langfield(The Movie Minute): Tip-toeing into the lacking in proper reserve, this documentary still stirs the source of action.


Red Hollywood

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
J. Hoberman(Village Voice): Makes a betokening (and entertaining) contribution to the history of the blacklist.


Jinn

Monday, April 7th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): A abhorrence franchise isn't born.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Clunky, missing engaging elements of exemption filmmaking that would make the viewer ask earnestly for a continuation. What's in the present state is a cluttered snooze that limps to a decision.

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