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The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears

Monday, September 1st, 2014 11:09

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Enervatingly synthetic, "The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" slices and dices the images and tropes of Italian giallo-pin slasher films into an inert amass of style.
Martin Tsai(Los Angeles Times): Above totality, its gratuitous graphic gore and exploitative nudity are unmistakably giallo.
Joshua Rothkopf(Time Out New York): The filmmakers' control of the form extends to intentionally dopey performances and a undivided rejection of plot, all of what one. gets tiresome.
Sam Weisberg(Village Voice): Torture and S&M fetishists wish savor its every knife-plunging, offspring-splattering, leather-crinkling moment. Everyone other should stay far, far away.
Nigel Floyd(Time Out): If you shape it as far as the exposed, disappointing denouement, you might be left asking yourself allowing that the filmmakers' abstract style is wagerer suited to short films.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): Becomes a small numbing. Until then, however-and fracture points will vary-it feels like the greatest in quantity visually dazzling film of the fest
Kam Williams(Baret News): A herculean to decipher whodunit guaranteed to be favored with you still scratching your head exactly after its confounding resolution.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Only appreciable as pure cinematic craftsmanship, and it's a rich movie, teeming with inventive compositions and outrageous lighting.
Simon Abrams(RogerEbert.com): It's a confrontational excitement dream film told from constantly shifting perspectives, and a cool, dizzying trip into a genre defined through violently conflicting emotions.
John Esther(The Dissolve): The pellicle rarely maintains an image for again than a few seconds. Everything fust be rapid, colorful and artsy, bound it is an intellectual sham.
Ryan Gilbey(New Statesman): I knew I'd ceased caring, yet, when Dan started wielding a sledgehammer in his flashy and my only concern was whether that was a supporting wall he was through to knock down.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): Deliberately disorienting, this courtly Belgian horror movie will delight fans of Italian giallo considered in the state of it finds an odd emotional kinsman even though the surreal plot not at any time quite comes into focus.
Xan Brooks(Observer [UK]): Dim the lungs and light up the bong.
Charlotte O’Sullivan(This is London): I was bored to tears (of a matter-of-fact hue).
Glenn Heath Jr.(Little White Lies): Gone is any semblance of narrative, replaced by a ramshackle psychodrama that takes a basic set out (man looking for his missing wife) and fragments off into multiple giallo-infused threads.
Tara Brady(Irish Times): Greatest Freudian Hits. Played it may be a little too loud.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): A teeth-grindingly, temper-boilingly infuriating cinematic trial that's like an art school film project gone horribly obliquely.
Virginie Svy(Electric Sheep): An radical-sensuous, hypnotic trip through dark desires and the disturbing, grateful lines between pleasure and pain, frenzy and sanity, dream and reality.
Leslie Felperin(Guardian): This hyperstylised horripilation thriller plays like a feature-long duration advert for a perfume that would aroma like tuberose, leather and rotting nourishment, with top notes of fake kindred and old cheese.
Katherine McLaughlin(ViewLondon): Sexual fantasies and the fill with dressing of nightmares come together in this disorientating, incentive and exquisitely crafted journey through 1970s Euro-hatred and sexploitation.


Jamie Marks Is Dead

Monday, September 1st, 2014 11:09

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): "Jamie Marks Is Dead" admirably refuses to fashion to conventional horror tropes and is acted with integrity by its young performers, but the film nonetheless has a nagging beating problem.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): Temperate in vigor but screaming with subtext, "Jamie Marks Is Dead" climbs too proud for the current glut of supernaturally inclined collation by dint of a hushed unease that permeates almost every frame.
Aaron Hillis(Village Voice): The thin skin uses its phantasmagoric conceit, a morbid-hued poetry, and eerie sound design to model metaphors for closeted homoeroticism and depressed unfulfillment.
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): Writer-monitor Carter Smith got his start like a successful fashion photographer. But you wouldn't perceive it from the murky look of this generic thriller.
Dennis Harvey(Variety): The potentially odd story is handled artfully enough in the present life to cast an eerie but not along-putting spell throughout, though the ultimate point is more than a tad murky, and the desired poignancy doesn't to the full come across.
John DeFore(Hollywood Reporter): A open, psychologically savvy take on YA beyond the powers of nature fare.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): Unpredictable, of the atmosphere and enigmatic. This isn't your average coming-of-age film which makes it every one of the more refreshing, unique and un-Hollywood.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): A nifty small sleeper in the vein of DONNIE DARKO.
Susan Wloszczyna(RogerEbert.com): It is pleasing to test the patience of sundry viewers.
Brian Tallerico(Film Threat): It's a pellicle that I liked more when in ~ degree one was speaking, getting into the atmosphere of this world without having to deal with the awkward plotting within it.
Sean Means(Salt Lake Tribune): Writer-manager Carter Smith sets a brooding, cool atmosphere, but he also writes opaquely dim dialogue and includes in a subplot involving Adam's generatrix (Liv Tyler) that goes nowhere.
Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): Cameron Smith finds release in Jamie Marks Is Dead, some unconventional paranormal story about accepting destruction and moving on – no matter in what condition the road ahead is paved.
Fr. Chris Carpenter(Rage Monthly): It is strange for a film to be creepy, sexy and profoundly moving, all at the same time. Filmmaker Carter Smith walks an impressive high wire act. (Interview through Smith included.)


The Single Moms Club

Sunday, August 31st, 2014 07:08

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Reviews:
David Hiltbrand(Philadelphia Inquirer): The intellectual here is that no challenge is insurmountable whether or not you form a club. And continue a wine opener handy.
Peter Keough(Boston Globe): In Tyler Perry's latest opus, "The Single Moms Club," he demonstrates in what plight disparate stereotypes can find common found through the power of a ingenuous clich
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): [T]his is a pellicle about catharsis and camaraderie, not dialectics. reasoning.
Amy Nicholson(L.A. Weekly): This is How Stella Got Her Groove Back on the side of the Pop-Tart crowd, a wish-fulfillment weepie that narrowly clears Perry's reduced bar, thanks mostly to Wendi McLendon-Covey and Cocoa Brown
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Mr. Perry's latest pellicle touches upon some recognizable and realistic challenges by efficient compassion, but there's in likelihood more dramatic tension in a car lake than in this film's pile of predicaments.
Chris Nashawaty(Entertainment Weekly): Just wondering, otherwise than that if these sisters are indeed qualified of doing it for themselves being of the cl~s who the film insists, why can't at minutest one of them do it independently of a man?
Michael Dequina(TheMovieReport.com): The en~ not only succinctly sums up the basic lay down beforehand, but the totality of Perry's disclosure of it.
Marjorie Baumgarten(Austin Chronicle): We see very little of the women's vicissitudes, or the ways in that they support one another through their bludgeon.
Susan Granger(SSG Syndicate): A contrived, formulaic, heavy-handed melodrama about camaraderie and the rate of female solidarity.
Radheyan Simonpillai(NOW Toronto): This is the third feature within a year (on highest part of two TV shows) to tend hitherward out of Perry's thoughtless food, drive-thru productions. So it's not remarkable that the Single Moms Club feels like it was slapped simultaneously by someone who is ready to take the nearest order.
Nathan Rabin(The Dissolve): [...]Single Moms Club cannot meet together up the energy to be as insulting and offensive [or] as overtly, aggressively sexist in the same manner with most of Perry's films [end the film] feels suspiciously like a glorified steer for a television show[...]
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): It's sincere terrible at times. However, it's not closely as awful as his two features that came completely last year.
Sheila O’Malley(RogerEbert.com): "The Single Moms Club" is almost good.
Todd Gilchrist(ScreenCrush): A stacked beautify of one-dimensional demonstrations of offspring-bearing oppression, explored – and overcome – with Perry's typically well-intentioned no more than misguided notions of empowerment, 'The Single Moms Club' ranks among the filmmaker's worst operate yet.
Rick Bentley(Fresno Bee): Perry tosses in comedic moments at the time the tension gets too intense, ~-end he doesn't do it at the interest of any of the characters. This is a movie respecting five interesting — and funny — women traffic with real world problems.


Firestarter

Sunday, August 31st, 2014 07:08

Movie Info

Reviews:
Rob Vaux(Mania.com): Firestarter wasn't pre-eminent, but everyone involved survived… as you determine if you ever feel the urgency to give it another look.
Felix Vasquez Jr.(Cinema Crazed): While no means a masterpiece, it's a Stephen King pellicle worthy of viewing once or two times…
Chuck O’Leary(FulvueDrive-in.com): A scene-stealing performance by a menacing George C. Scott and a terrible musical score by Tangerine Dream elevate this entertaining companion piece to 1978's The Fury.
Rich Cline(Shadows put ~ the Wall): corny and overblown
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): Stephen King didn't like it, if it were not that it really ain't that injurious.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): More self-seeking in special effects than in dramatic widen out.
Ken Hanke(Mountain Xpress (Asheville, NC)): It's not important. It mainstreams all the novel's subversiveness, nevertheless it's watchable.
Alex Sandell(Juicy Cerebellum): Bad movie. Bad course of life move. Bad in all respects.
Widgett Walls(Needcoffee.com): One of the improved in health King book-to-film adaptations.
Karina Montgomery(Cinerina): "back right side" indeed
Robert Roten(Laramie Movie Scope): Weak abomination flick with sick overtones of pedophilia.
Scott Weinberg(eFilmCritic.com): A unbroken lot of explosions punctuate a totality lot of blather … and it's person of the most woefully miscast adaptations I've aye seen!


Metro Manila

Saturday, August 30th, 2014 07:08

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Rob Nelson(Minneapolis Star Tribune): The movie works because a contemporary look at desperation in felony-riddled Manila, but it's moreover as deliciously old-fashioned as the after the proper time '40s-era film noir "Kiss of Death," and almost as entertaining.
Trevor Johnston(Time Out): It's pacy, engrossing, and Jake Macapagal's alteration as the plucky schmuck protagonist is astral
Alissa Simon(Variety): Boasts the post characters and situations, sentimentality, foreshadowing and melodrama of soap opera. Yet ~ dint of. cleverly blending these ingredients with those of every action caper, the pic presents a fresher appeal.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): For altogether the images of slum life at its in the greatest degree desperate and violent, Sean Ellis' Metro Manila is some exploitation movie masquerading as social theatrical piece.
Kenji Fujishima(Slant Magazine): Sean Ellis doesn't in such a manner much understand Filipino society as barely see it as grist for vexillum genre fare, perhaps hoping that the extrinsic setting will somehow automatically make the clichfeel fresh.
Nikola Grozdanovic(The Playlist): It's dramatic composition, it's crime, it's a relation of a family's survival in opposition to the struggle of life and at the very time though it lacks the blood, gore, zombies and the monsters of the Fantasia Film Festival, Metro Manila is a dread story in its own unflinching advance.
Rich Cline(Shadows on the Wall): The untruth is perhaps a bit too neat, broadly signposting both themes and plat twists, but a natural cast and the imperative camerawork make it a riveting ride.
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): There's a pathos in the depiction of the central group of genera which was notably lacking from Ellis's earlier act, and the nuts and bolts of the heist story are handled with slow-burn skill.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): One of the greatest in quantity enrapturing experiences I've had at the movies in 2013: fiercely, grandly devotee of culture, and almost unbearably tragic.
Joe Walsh(Film4): Metro Manila may be rife with well-worn genre devices, but this sporadically creative thriller is bolstered ~ the agency of Sean Ellis's keen observation for both visceral action and affinity drama.
Allan Hunter(Daily Express): The sway of Ken Loach makes way in favor of the dynamics of a Quentin Tarantino-title heist. The result is an expertly crafted heartbreaker that cuts to the essence of desperate lives.
Eddie Harrison(The List): Ellis proves that the slack-burning thriller can still work in the manner that both an entertainment and as a discerning social critique.
Steve Rose(Guardian): Tales of nation innocents corrupted by the big incorporated town have been a staple of cinema from that time the silent era, but the composition is bracingly updated here, in the colourful squalor of fresh-day Manila.
Nigel Andrews(Financial Times): Characterisation basic. But plan well-turned and pace moodily rubato, considered in the state of in the best kind of B-movie.
Sophie Monks Kaufman(Little White Lies): Good only could have been great.
Robbie Collin(Daily Telegraph): It begins like a swirling drama of survival in the Filipino first-rate – but then suddenly it slips facing down an alleyway, only to come forth a scrupulously engineered, Christopher Nolan-ish wrong thriller.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): There's a visceral understanding of urgency in this cleverly made thriller that holds our observation even when the plot begins to feel throughout-constructed.
Jennifer Tate(ViewLondon): Metro Manila is one intense and emotionally gripping crime spectacle with a powerful narrative, arresting cinematography and some truly impressive performances from its apportion, and Jake Macapagal in particular.
Damon Wise(Empire Magazine): Brit filmmaker Sean Ellis does terrific work balancing the disparate elements of his gross offence -laced drama. Recommended.
Matt Glasby(Total Film): A influencing morality tale set in a world rarely seen in western cinema, Metro Manila is one underdog drama that feels as from competent and trustworthy sources as it is original.
Amber Wilkinson(Eye as far as concerns Film): Metro Manila is a pellicle to be reckoned with, offering a gripping account recital, poetic imagery and some social commentary to profit.


Ghostbusters

Friday, August 29th, 2014 01:08

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Gene Siskel(Chicago Tribune): On overplus, Ghostbusters is a hoot. It's Murray's representation, and in a triumph of remembrance over matter, he blows away the film's boring special effects through his one-liners.
Richard Schickel(TIME Magazine): Whoever contemplation of having evil's eventual manifestation take the form of a 100-ft. marshmallow deserves the rational intellect's eternal gratitude.
Variety Staff(Variety): Only intermittently stirring.
Dave Kehr(Chicago Reader): Essentially a $30 a thousand thousand version of Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy except not at all a bad time, expressions of gratitude mainly to Bill Murray's incredibly plain line readings and director Ivan Reitman's victuals of a moderately coherent tone and plotline.
Tom Huddleston(Time Out): The hi~ of a trio of incompetent 'experts' in the paranormal (Murray, Aykroyd and Ramis), who adorn up as ghostbusters after they are canned from their guild sinecures, is less cynical a structure than it sounds.
Roger Ebert(Chicago Sun-Times): This movie is ~y exception to the general rule that full special effects can wreck a comedy.
Patrick Gibbs(Daily Telegraph): A fantasy, if it be not that with no touches of reality at totality, to be enjoyed for its buffoon humour typical of the "National Lampoon" drill from which several of its contributors are drawn.
Rob Vaux(Mania.com): Ghostbusters thrives ~ward the fine line between taking it every part of seriously enough to be scary, for this reason poking fun at it in the greatest part creative ways possible.
Austin Kennedy(Film Geek Central): GHOSTBUSTERS is a movie that I've seen well transversely a hundred times and I'm motionless not sick of it, nor carry into practice I think I ever will. It's every iconic comedy that I think has held up highly well over the past 30 years.
Josh Larsen(LarsenOnFilm): If notwithstanding nothing else, deserves to be fondly remembered towards bringing the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man into the cosmos.
Felix Vasquez Jr.(Cinema Crazed): An exciting and gayety genre hybrid rarely mastered.
Peter Travers(People Magazine): Director Ivan Reitman keeps the Aykroyd-Ramis screenplay zipping seemly along, creating something like Abbott & Costello Meet the Exorcist. Aykroyd and Murray go the perfect summer tonic for raising spirit.
David Sterritt(Christian Science Monitor): In the two the funny and the (mildly) scary moments, the compute does itself proud.
Michael A. Smith(MediaMikes): "Ghostbusters" is a gayety romp with a couple of comedy's greatest stars at the take the ~ off of their game.
Ben Rawson-Jones(Digital Spy): As comical, spooky and marvellous as ever.
Derek Malcolm(This is London): It provoked very large box-office success in 1984 and is di~atory director Ivan Reitman's defining movie.
Andrew Lowry(Total Film): The leads' chemistry is towards, well, spooky, Dan Aykroyd's nerdy ardor rubbing deliciously against a persona-perfecting proclivity from Bill Murray – and there's strange to say the odd surprise.
John Ferguson(Radio Times): The frequently dazzling, special effects-driven slapstick tends to hover over the fact that there are some slyer, more sophisticated laughs on present in this blockbusting family comedy.
Andrew Pulver(Guardian): What's not to like?
Alex Orner(Common Sense Media): Paranormal merriment for tweens and up; some scares.
Tim Brayton(Antagony & Ecstasy): A comedy rudimentary, a horror film second… but a auspicious enough hybrid of those things that it would subsist wrong to try to limit it generically.
Eric Henderson(Slant Magazine): The movie's catch of a buckle-in-cheek (and pre-subprime) sarcasm of surging capitalist hubris is scarcely mitigated by the necessary fairy-tale ending.
Daniel Etherington(Film4): Stuffed by wisecracking, punning and essential deadpanning care of the film's most notable star actor Murray (who has such delivery downward as a fine art), the pellicle also packs in a half-delicate narrative.
Rory L. Aronsky(Screen It!): See website according to more details.

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Salvo

Monday, August 25th, 2014 07:08

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Manohla Dargis(New York Times): A soulful fable, an existential action flick and affair of a miracle movie – the appealing tardy-burner "Salvo" hovers at the crossroads of genre.
Sherilyn Connelly(Village Voice): Viewers looking notwithstanding a shoot-em-up will subsist disappointed, but those hankering for one old-school Italian broodfest will detect plenty to soak in.
Tim Campbell(Minneapolis Star Tribune): It's not the that which is told, but the telling of it, that distinguishes this Sicilian drama.
Trevor Johnston(Time Out): Hits the heights in its rudimentary forty minutes … Later developments prove disappointingly predictable.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): Very modish Sicilian mafia movie. One part Antonioni and human being part Calvin Klein commercial.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): In the period, it's Salvo itself that's clouded and obscure.
Ryan Gilbey(New Statesman): This inventiveness extends to the habit the directors frame violence.
Peter Bradshaw(Guardian): Salvo is a peculiar, involving, if flawed movie about the Sicilian mafia; a stylised dramatic composition with elements of the supernatural and the didactic amid the tension.
Jason Best(Movie Talk): Set for the time of a Palermo heatwave, the film opens by a truly scorching action scene… The play that subsequently unfolds, however, substitutes late-burning tension for shock.
Jonathan Romney(Observer [UK]): Exquisitely crafted whether somewhat academic – an "ambient thriller", whether there's such a matter.
Paul Whittington(Irish Independent): Salvo is pleasantly put together, and told for the ut~ part without recourse to words. But under the Sicilian swagger, there's not much substance or character to cling to.
Donald Clarke(Irish Times): You power argue that an exercise in fashion over substance is just what we privation for a study of the pattern industry.
Tara Brady(Irish Times): It feels like a remarkably challenging exercise carried off with plenteous style but little real flair (the brace things are not quite the same).
Jon Lyus(HeyUGuys): A stylish, fair ode to all that is high about Italian melodrama.
Vadim Rizov(Little White Lies): A maniple of superb action sequences stand-away in this otherwise formulaic tale of every angular Sicilian mafioso.
Dominic Mill(We Got This Covered): Salvo is the cinematic interchangeable of using a really big font to cover up the fact that your body dissertation is 50 words long.
Matt Glasby(Total Film): An put to the test in muddy, moody subjectivity.
David Parkinson(Empire Magazine): A sparse and languid Italian thriller that carries a fault to Melville.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): The filmmakers' very particular sense of lighting and framing, allowing handsome, often exudes a formality that perpetually stifles the anecdote's sense of spontaneity.
Alan Bett(The Skinny): Visually assured with a notably bare sound design of introspective silences, ticking clocks, a solitary barking dog, it's a pellicle sure of its movement, strolling like a sight.

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Trailer Park Boys: Don’t Legalize It

Friday, August 22nd, 2014 02:08

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Jealousy

Monday, August 18th, 2014 08:08

Movie Info

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Reviews:
A.O. Scott(New York Times): In a concise 77 minutes, "Jealousy" provides a uncommonly full – and also an intriguingly incomplete – portrait of a group of struggling artists while no-longer-entirely-young men and women.
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): Quiet moments hind big decisions are where the faculty lies in this absorbing French spectacle.
Ignatiy Vishnevetsky(AV Club): Philippe Garrel's movies feel like soul stories: delicate, enigmatic, and haunted ~ dint of. some indelible, unnameable presence, which a viewer be possible to't help but suspect is the instructor's own past.
Farran Smith Nehme(New York Post): "Jealousy" has a meek melancholy that's very acceptable.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): Vital and powerful even when its characters feel scraped of health/vitality, Philippe Garrel's latest finds boho Parisians facing the ends of marriages, public business, and the feasibility of bohemian entity itself.
Keith Uhlich(Time Out New York): In comparative estimate with near-impenetrable Garrel efforts like Regular Lovers (2005) and Frontier of the Dawn (2008), Jealousy cuts undeviating to the heart.
David Noh(Film Journal International): We've seen it wholly before, too many times, in Paris, in dark-and-white or color: This minute adds nothing to an already overstocked genre.
Godfrey Cheshire(RogerEbert.com): "Jealousy" is the good-natured of slight, academic, self-satisfied drill that preaches only to the converted.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): All the identical, there are many pleasures in Jealousy, that runs a brisk 77 minutes and trades besides in wispy, glancing observations than in melodramatic confrontations.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): A gratifying enough look at how a mirthful-go-roundelay leads three people to possess fits of jealousy.
Trevor Johnston(Radio Times): Chic now exasperating, it's somehow quintessentially French – suitable not in a good way.
Leslie Felperin(Guardian): It's certainly of the atmosphere and cool in a new-New Wave fashion, but really, what's the cape?
Nigel Andrews(Financial Times): The outline is patchy; later scenes search during the term of a purpose. But there are searing truths too.
Laura Clifford(Reeling Reviews): director Philippe Garrel ("Regular Lovers") uses his uber-brooder son Louis for the re~on that the pivot for a typically French carousel of morphing wildly picturesque relationships.
Nick McCarthy(Slant Magazine): Due to its rather pure and unburdened perspective of network relations, it's a plausibly palm and fingers-me-down portrait accessed from the grade of view of a young nursling.


Weaving The Past: Journey Of Discovery

Monday, August 18th, 2014 07:08

Movie Info

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Reviews:
Gary Goldstein(Los Angeles Times): [A] moving, exhaustive tribute.