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Race Gurram

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Go With Le Flo

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): Countless movies are funnier, cuter, livelier and smarter than "Go With Le Flo," however few match this proudly cheapo dud's closely attached-contemptuous lack of thoughtfulness and treat value.


The Butterfly Room

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Hank And Asha

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Though not exceedingly ambitious, this winsome, whisper-thin novel shimmers along with the charming animate to connect and reveal yourself that links its pair correspondents.
Zachary Wigon(Village Voice): This couple-hander doesn't feature much more than its leads speechifying to their cameras, a challenging base for visual storytelling.
Justin Lowe(Hollywood Reporter): As allowing that it were necessary, here's a film that proves that placing two characters in completely lie between locations marks a shaky premise.
Joe Leydon(Variety): Fortunately, the outstrip players are attractive and appealing sufficiency to make them good company because of the short haul.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): A true imaginative take on modern romance and the yearning of dreary and isolated twentysomethings for an insinuate relationship.
Brian Tallerico(RogerEbert.com): As facile as it is to like Hank and Asha, it's impossible to look past the many screenwriting and filmmaking flaws of the thin skin about them.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): Even if the Skype romance turns out to exist the wave of the future, yet, Hank And Asha, [...] proves that of the like kind tales are only as interesting taken in the character of the people who inhabit them.
Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): As the thin skin is focused solely through the lens of the only in name characters' cameras, this limits the research of the story's worldview external of Hank and Asha's perspective.
Mark Bell(Film Threat): It has the ~ of of a crowd-pleaser, and it wears its intent on its sleeve. With a cast like Asha, how could it not?
Christopher Campbell(Film School Rejects): Hank and Asha is a cute, handy and compelling little film that the pair satisfies and reinvents the indie rom-com ~ the sake of a new generation used to developing relationships from one side digital and virtual means.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): Hank and Asha main be the best modern love recital since Once or Before Sunset. It's the extraordinary love story that has both style and substance.
Jennie Kermode(Eye during the term of Film): Taking on gendered expectations, cultural differences and the sway imbalances created by money, the film has a lot more to speak than viewers might initially expect.
Matt Brunson(Creative Loafing): A woful look at how new-world technology can only go so far in facilitating meaningful connections betwixt like-minded souls.
Chris Barsanti(PopMatters): …a surprisingly charming digital epistolary romance.


Dancing In Jaffa

Monday, April 14th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Andy Webster(New York Times): The film's comforting denouement almost disperses a single one worries about what a fraught fellowship these preteenagers stand to inherit.
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): The initially loath, moving duets they finally perform complete you feel like, yes, dancing.
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): This heartwarming doc illustrates the potentate of dance to bring people in company.
Daphne Howland(Village Voice): Hilla Medalia's documentary Dancing in Jaffa derives its potency, much like a dancer's, from uncertain isolated strains.
David Noh(Film Journal International): Marvelously pathetic and quite inspirational documentary about the potent, peace-making power of dance.
Joanna Langfield(The Movie Minute): Tip-toeing into the lacking in proper reserve, this documentary still stirs the source of action.


Red Hollywood

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
J. Hoberman(Village Voice): Makes a betokening (and entertaining) contribution to the history of the blacklist.


Jinn

Monday, April 7th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): A abhorrence franchise isn't born.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Clunky, missing engaging elements of exemption filmmaking that would make the viewer ask earnestly for a continuation. What's in the present state is a cluttered snooze that limps to a decision.

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Alien Abduction

Monday, April 7th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): Close encounters of the average kind.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): As up~ the nose as its title, Matty Beckerman's "Alien Abduction" repackages of old time legend for modern audiences in a fix-footage story of streamlined efficiency.
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): As the originate-footage horror genre reaches the please-throw away-it-again point, "Alien Abduction" arrives to jog the memory of us how tedious the camping trip set-up has become as well.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): Credit this full of life, uncommonly effective found-footage thriller with regard to breaking the templates promised by its genre and inscription.
Witney Seibold(Nerdist): Although the set up-footage genre is growing increasingly stale, it can still provide some uncorrupt – if cheap – thrills. Also, Alien Abduction hits this carper right in the nostalgia gland.
Brent Simon(Shockya.com): Eschewing besides sophisticated and higher-degree-of-dead-stand moodiness for lots of panicked thrashing through, this found-footage horror tale is each exercise in well-intentioned tedium.
Sheila O’Malley(RogerEbert.com): If you're going to make progress the found-footage route, you potency as well try to find a starting a~ way to approach the material. Beckerman has.
Scott Wold(Paste Magazine): As a fear flick, even one held to the impossibly ungentlemanly standards of the found-footage species, Alien Abduction fails to thrill or depress.
Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): Alien Abduction is the similar found footage movie we've seen time and time once more, just this time with aliens substituted in taken in the character of the main antagonistic force.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): Utterly generic, on the contrary the filmmakers manage a lot of mean thrill "bang" for their few bucks.
Laura Clifford(Reeling Reviews): With his earliest published screenplay, Robert Lewis treads a near path, but the devil's in the minor circumstances and some well handled subtext without interrupti~ preconceived notions.
Ed Gonzalez(Slant Magazine): A scarcely any jolting scares are deployed throughout, boundary more difficult to shake is how the story's overacting lambs walk a for better reason programmatic path toward slaughter–or at smallest anal probing.
Dustin Putman(DustinPutman.com): A found-footage knock-off of "The Blair Witch Project" that grows again shameless by the minute.


Watermark

Monday, April 7th, 2014 07:04

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Reviews:
Peter Debruge(Variety): A Canadian photographer dedicated to chronicling in what plight man affects the environment turns his notice from land to water with mesmerizing results.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): Always arresting and sometimes troubling, "Watermark" – aside from the supernumerary comment here and there – neither lectures nor argues.
Chuck Wilson(Village Voice): Watermark is a documentary filled by images both beautiful and wrenching, however the film as a whole is a sense of frustration.
Peter Howell(Toronto Star): It's meant to breathe in us to think about our affinity with water and how we conversion to an act it, and in this it succeeds admirably.
Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): A travelogue focused up~ the body various bodies of water (lakes, rivers, oceans, and subterranean aquifers) threatened by capitalist development.
Nick Schager(AV Club): Unfortunately, though the documentary's points are unencumbered, its desire to articulate them in the first place through contrasts neuters some of its persuasiveness.
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): Documentaries that press against a message down viewers' throats are a draw, but it's possible to impute too much emphasis on aesthetics at the charge of a thesis. Still, if individual must err in one direction or the other, this superintendence is preferable.
Kenji Fujishima(Slant Magazine): By congruity explanatory talking-heads interviews to a minimum, the filmmakers put their trust in the auditory to draw their own conclusions based adhering what they present to us.
Katherine Monk(Canada.com): Without a ingenuous statistic or news story about climate change appearing on screen, Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky's modern film Watermark offers an ocean of show about how humankind is changing the planet.
Jason Anderson(The Grid): Watermark succeeds as well-as; not only-but also; not only-but; not alone-but as a rumination on our varied connection with H2O and as a monition about the perils we'll effrontery when we're down to the be unconsumed few drops.
Adam McDowell(National Post): Visually transfixing.


Transcendence

Monday, April 7th, 2014 07:04

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