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Archives

The Divine Move

Monday, July 28th, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
David Noh(Film Journal International): Excessive impetuosity and off-the-wall plotting mine an intriguing game-based premise.


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Monday, July 28th, 2014 07:07

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Rich Hill

Monday, July 28th, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
Duane Byrge(Hollywood Reporter): A severely-eyed but empathetic glimpse into the hardscrabble lives of struggling Missouri folk.
Peter Debruge(Variety): An begin-hearted portrait of impoverished American life …
Eric Kohn(indieWIRE): Though not a part of the trio share a pageant together, the varying degrees of annoyance that define their lives form a larger overview of instability.
Tim Grierson(Paste Magazine): Their documentary focuses without ceasing three young people in Rich Hill, still more broadly Rich Hill is a likeness of poverty and diminished dreams in America's heartland.
Daniel Walber(Nonfics): Palermo and Tragos divulge the immediate truth of their subjects though simultaneously projecting themes and ideas that articulate to a much broader audience. That equilibrium is the core of nonfiction cunning.
Dan Schindel(Movie Mezzanine): A portentous look at pubescent melancholy and rustic living.
Katie Walsh(The Playlist): A correctly moving and edifying film, Rich Hill is the emblem of media object that could and should exist put in a time capsule conducive to future generations.


Rigor Mortis

Sunday, July 27th, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
Colin Covert(Minneapolis Star Tribune): With visuals this gruesome and stale, who needs seamless storytelling?
Daniel M. Gold(New York Times): [A] relentlessly creepy thin skin
Tom Keogh(Seattle Times): Even whether or not Mak's drawn-out specifical effects seem like overkill, the vessel line is that he spins a useful campfire yarn.
Martin Tsai(Los Angeles Times): Director Juno Mak might have pulled off this potpourri whether or not it weren't for a cop-not at home ending.
Ignatiy Vishnevetsky(AV Club): A discolored, relatively humorless, slow-build horror movie whose connection to the hopping-vampire craze would strike one as being tenuous if it weren't continually asserting it.
Justin Chang(Variety): Multihyphenate Juno Mak makes his directing debut with this tedious tribute to Hong Kong's 'hopping vampires' subgenre.
Dustin Putman(DustinPutman.com): [Blu-intellectual light Review] Lacking in scares and hesitation, the picture throttles its audience through visual effects and evocative imagery, mete never gets to the heart of the characters.
Ron Wilkinson(It’s Just Movies): What is to all appearance an acceptable horror flick for Eastern audiences offers subtleties that are absentminded on us poor Westerners. Glutinous rice?
Mark R. Leeper(Mark Leeper’s Reviews): A triumph of visual images over plotting
Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): Rigor Mortis can't fully work for a Western auditory, but it does at least contract a fascinating glimpse of a inexplicable genre that never quite crossed in addition.
Anton Bitel(Sight and Sound): some elegantly realised revitalisation of a puzzled mode of Hong Kong horror, through loss itself, as well as cinema's special power to preserve and even resurrect the dead, key to its elegantly eerie impact.

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Behaving Badly

Monday, July 21st, 2014 08:07

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A Five Star Life

Monday, July 21st, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
Andrew Barker(Variety): Maria Sole Tognazzi's improbable comedy proves more effective as a resort showcase than because an emotionally involving narrative.
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): You won't light upon much heft in Maria Sole Tognazzi's Italian dramedy, if it were not that it'll make for a respectable mini-vacation if you could exercise a brief escape.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): Narratively and emotionally, this weirdly becalmed bawble by Maria Sole Tognazzi ends up not quite exactly where it started.
Nick Schager(Village Voice): Tognazzi shoots her material with stately grace but a defined lack of energy, which is in addition true of Buy's sedate but inert lead performance.
Odie Henderson(RogerEbert.com): "A Five Star Life" shows a portion not often seen in American cinema, at smallest in films that aren't police procedurals: It shows an ordinary citizen doing her job.
Marsha McCreadie(Film Journal International): With a great number of travelogue-type footage and more introspection, director Maria Sole Tognazzi's A Five Star Life finds a new angle to the women's issues we judgment we already settled, or at minutest had enough of for now.
Jen Chaney(The Dissolve): A not rarely sumptuous pleasure to watch.
Chuck Bowen(Slant Magazine): The instructor diligently keeps her heroine's me in check, and that's awfully principled of her, but that her audience may feel as whether they've inadvertently booked a throw off the balance with no destination.
Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): A ravishing comedy about a woman with a pretence to die for but who would toward gladly give up the endless plush hotels on the supposition that the right man came along.

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Get On Up

Monday, July 21st, 2014 07:07

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Pantani: The Accidental Death Of A Cyclist

Monday, July 14th, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
Dave Calhoun(Time Out): An potent, sprightly sports doc about the a~ and fall of 1990s cycling superstar Marco Pantani.
Jamie S. Rich(Oregonian): James Erskine crafts one empathetic portrait of the athlete, who came from matter of no consequence to gain everything and then ruin it all.
Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): You're left through the impression that the charismatic Pantani was besides sinned against than sinning.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): Filmmaker James Erskine gives just the most profoundly uninitiated viewer (so as me) plenty of opportunities to apprehend, cheer for, and mourn the work~…
Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): This may be a romanticised account but it makes a exhortation case for its subject and makes us make out why, before his fall from benignity, he was so adored by every rung of Italian society.
Charlotte O’Sullivan(This is London): The sense you get of this man is that he was grievous to heal his own wounds ~ dint of. winning.
Jon Lyus(HeyUGuys): Pantani is finally a disappointment as it takes a gripping and politic story and tells it in a passage which is often dull and frustrating.
Allan Hunter(Daily Express): It makes for a great story but Pantani remains an elusive figure and the thin skin is annoyingly inconclusive and evasive – further determined to cheer his achievements than travel through observingly the bigger picture of his go and fall.
David Jenkins(Little White Lies): A compact, but very basic documentary profile of the tragically gone giant of '90s cycling.
Antonia Quirke(Financial Times): Pantani's rush and delight in his own forte always come through – he still commands the select of respect Lance Armstrong (who appears to this place now and again, at his greatest number hubristic) can only dream of.
Mike McCahill(Guardian): The play of a premature death persists, and Erskine puts in enough legwork to keep the rest competing.
D.W. Mault(The Skinny): James Erskine's pellicle attempts to get inside this visceral terraqueous globe via the prism of the gallant Pantani, a man more loved than a single one cyclist in living memory.
Eddie Harrison(The List): There's not in a great degree enough compelling visual material to absolve feature length.
Paul M. Bradshaw(Total Film): Essential sleeplessness, even for anyone who can't stand the amusement.
Siobhan Synnot(Scotsman): An intriguing picture of a man exposed as a put ~s into cheat, yet who still commands a awe that disgraced Lance Armstrong would bestow his eye teeth for.
Simon Crook(Empire Magazine): Stylishly constructed excepting hollow and ultimately lacking in insights.

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Autonagar Surya

Monday, July 7th, 2014 07:07

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Focus On The Family Presents: Irreplaceable

Monday, July 7th, 2014 07:07

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Reviews:
Nell Minow(Beliefnet): Uses the eloquence of support for family as a delicate and increasingly cynical and specious embody for a pernicious agenda disguised taken in the character of a "conversation."

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