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Archives

I Am Eleven

Monday, September 15th, 2014 09:09

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Reviews:
Neil Genzlinger(New York Times): The throw could easily have seemed like a smarmy Nickelodeon e~ or some variant of "Kids Say the Darndest Things," on the contrary Ms. Bailey's willingness to obstruction the children talk and to give leave to the viewer impose broader meaning elevates it.
Frank Scheck(Hollywood Reporter): The cast of the face-length film ultimately becomes repetitive, with the lack of contextual information ready the subjects' lives rendering the proceedings simple.
Graham Fuller(New York Daily News): Bailey resists sentimentality. She furthermore revisits some children when they generate older, which gives her film some echo of Michael Apted's "7 Up" succession. This one, though, is stunning in its confess right.
Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): Heaped contemporaneously into a feature, these brief introductions verify frustrating, unrevealing of any greater truth, and weighed down by the soundtrack's gay ukuleles …
Richard Kuipers(Variety): Docu's and nothing else slight blemish is some repetitive sacred scriptures. Tech aspects are fine.
Mallory Andrews(Movie Mezzanine): The pellicle is pleasant enough as a compliant anthropological exercise, though it reveals small insight.
Kam Williams(Baret News): Pearls of good sense from the mouths of babes uttered through such heartfelt conviction that you lack to believe them, even when you're a inconsiderable skeptical.
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): An entertaining and appealing documentary in regard to the hopes, dreams, and fears of eleven year olds on all sides the world.
Anna Storm(Film Journal International): …'Eleven' is not recent; Bailey's work is merely and certainly the energetic, optimistic film she set out to make.
Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): Pretty and eager for distinction, but scattered and inconsequential.
Glenn Dunks(Onya Magazine): Racism, need, bullying, and traditional culture rear their horrible heads in some of the lives, boundary its important to note that Bailey's trust statement seems to be, most of completely, to highlight the positive.
Andrew L. Urban(Urban Cinefile): More than a twelve 11 year olds make up the lay aside of this simple and sincere doco boor together by young Melbourne journalist Genevieve Bailey during a world trip
Jim Schembri(3AW): Beautifully made, insightful, strange documentary about growing up…the continual snap shots of contrast keep the spirit of this celebratory film beating.
Don Groves(sbs.com.au): Superb Australian doco views the cosmos through innocent eyes.

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Smiling Through the Apocalypse: Esquire in the 60s

Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09

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Reviews:
Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): It's both a credit to, and a shortcoming of, the movie that it suggests every illustrated bibliography. It makes you deficiency to stop watching and, instead, decipher or reread all of the pieces mentioned.
Calum Marsh(Village Voice): The pellicle mounts a compelling case on account of what was, perhaps, a arrange of genius – a rare gift in quest of identifying talent in others and nurturing it, in like manner amplifying it.


The Frontier

Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09

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Reviews:
Anita Gates(New York Times): The thin skin means well but feels generic, strained and claustrophobic (in the teeth of several scenes at a deserted rim), with tight close-ups and unusual confrontations.
Michael Nordine(Village Voice): There's clearly a troubled chronicle here, but co-writer/director Matt Rabinowitz doesn't artfully restrain information so much as lay it totality on the table a bit earlier than he efficacy have.
Maitland McDonagh(Film Journal International): While its scenic prospects are limited…The Frontier could notice a strong second life via cable and streaming video, especially among older moviegoers looking for constitution-driven dramas rather than action-ponderous genre pictures.


The Quitter

Monday, September 15th, 2014 08:09

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Reviews:
Joe Neumaier(New York Daily News): "Quitter" is confident and offhandedly sweet. And it's a assistance from the easy pitches that fix the limits of so many projects, big and shallow.
Anita Gates(New York Times): Remember while indie films starred normal people with average cheekbones and jawlines, inadequately lighted? Matthew Bonifacio's "The Quitter" is a return to that style, and a downright story well told.
Danny King(Village Voice): As The Quitter progresses, Jonathan utterly grows nicer and nicer, rendering the disposition's obligatory, runtime-padding third-act doubts false and unconvincing.
Maitland McDonagh(Film Journal International): …The Quitter is destined in spite of niche markets where, with any hap, it will find a core congregation of viewers looking for movies with more heart than razzle-dazzle.


Era Uma Vez Eu, Ver

Friday, September 12th, 2014 14:09

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Reviews:
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Mr. Gomes remnants laudably faithful to his character, and Ms. Guedes's entirely sense of languor gets across greater amount of than any crystal-clear dramatic specification would.
Danny King(Village Voice): Guedes's intricate performance leaves no doubt regarding the feebleness of Veronica's psyche.
Neil Young(Hollywood Reporter): Brazil's Marcelo Gomes leaps to the forehead rank of South American filmmakers.
Dennis Harvey(Variety): Especially concerning a movie whose title is in the chief person, "Once Upon a Time Was I, Veronica" doesn't ~ up much of an effort to make acquisition into the head of its protagonist …


Wetlands

Monday, September 8th, 2014 07:09

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Reviews:
David Edelstein(New York Magazine/Vulture): Women merit their own gross-out movies, and, in Wetlands, the strumpet force is strong.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): With her muddy-blond curls and angelic smile, Helen is abundantly alive in a way that's completely too rare on our movie screens. She's not at a loss to shock or sicken; that's your point to be solved, not hers.
Peter Travers(Rolling Stone): Wetlands is here to freak out the prudes and do the part of "dirty" fun again. That it does. You won't discover a better movie anywhere that features a teen lass using her crotch to wipe a men toilet seat.
Jenni Miller(AV Club): Wetlands is wonderfully nasty and wildly perverse, occasionally funny, and uniform a little sad.
Sara Stewart(New York Post): Take billet, Lars von Trier: This is in what way you do a truly funny, destructive movie about a woman's obsession with the human body and sex.
Joshua Rothkopf(Time Out New York): Dank through the effluvia of a proudly unhygienic, sex-obsessed German teen, this frenetic adaptation of Charlotte Roche's well-known 2008 best-seller is a station dare to anyone who thinks the movies gain gotten too tame.
Kimber Myers(The Playlist): "Wetlands" is more than just a film that shares well-nigh more about anal fissures than you perpetually wanted to know, it's a surprisingly redolence coming-of-age comedy brimming with punk-rock energy and an impressive performance from Swiss actress Carla Juri.
Kurt Loder(Reason Online): That infrequent thing, a movie that's exactly unlike any other…
Glenn Kenny(RogerEbert.com): An inventively acute, briskly edited, spectacularly-acted post-etc. coming-of-age story.
Jesse Knight(Movie Mezzanine): But what skyrockets Wetlands above and beyond is that it's mettlesome enough to go even further and inquiry why such scenarios are so regularly feared at total.
Jake Wilson(Sydney Morning Herald): Helen's see of life and sex may exist unusual, but it's estranged healthier — if that word has some meaning — than, say, the pseudo-science of causes of Lars von Trier's joyless Nymphomaniac.
Diego Costa(Slant Magazine): For its ordinary ludic obsession with all things usually thought of as disgusting, the German thin skin Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage-coach.
Eric Kohn(indieWIRE): The shock estimate only goes so far as a gimmick. Wetlands succeeds for the cause that, like Helen, it manages to purely embrace its taboos.
Scott Tobias(The Dissolve): Wetlands finally belongs to Juri, who steadies the fractured storytelling and turns Helen into some improbable punk hero, unashamed in her delivering to bucking societal norms and root as nasty as she wants to exist .
Tom Clift(Concrete Playground): While her behaviour give by ~ frequently have you hiding behind your hands, Helen's unshakably non-conformist predicament makes her an easy protagonist to like.
Cole Smithey(ColeSmithey.com): Challenging and exciting, co-writer/director David Wnendt's strong adaptation of Charlotte Roche's presumably unfilmable plain novel, breaks new cinematic ground.
Simon Foster(Screen-Space): (The) furious bombast and sweetness that Carla Juri brings to the role infuses the undiminished film; evoking the charisma and vulnerableness of Meg Ryan and Julia Roberts in their exultation, she is an A-list eminent person of the future.

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The Maze Runner

Monday, September 8th, 2014 07:09

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Reviews:
Matthew Pejkovic(Matt’s Movie Reviews): Another young ripened sci-fi tale of survival is played exhausted to sparsely thrilling and all moreover familiar results, proving the popular genre has press its course.

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The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears

Monday, September 1st, 2014 11:09

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Reviews:
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Enervatingly synthetic, "The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" slices and dices the images and tropes of Italian giallo-pin slasher films into an inert amass of style.
Martin Tsai(Los Angeles Times): Above totality, its gratuitous graphic gore and exploitative nudity are unmistakably giallo.
Joshua Rothkopf(Time Out New York): The filmmakers' control of the form extends to intentionally dopey performances and a undivided rejection of plot, all of what one. gets tiresome.
Sam Weisberg(Village Voice): Torture and S&M fetishists wish savor its every knife-plunging, offspring-splattering, leather-crinkling moment. Everyone other should stay far, far away.
Nigel Floyd(Time Out): If you shape it as far as the exposed, disappointing denouement, you might be left asking yourself allowing that the filmmakers' abstract style is wagerer suited to short films.
A.A. Dowd(AV Club): Becomes a small numbing. Until then, however-and fracture points will vary-it feels like the greatest in quantity visually dazzling film of the fest
Kam Williams(Baret News): A herculean to decipher whodunit guaranteed to be favored with you still scratching your head exactly after its confounding resolution.
Brian Orndorf(Blu-beam.com): Only appreciable as pure cinematic craftsmanship, and it's a rich movie, teeming with inventive compositions and outrageous lighting.
Simon Abrams(RogerEbert.com): It's a confrontational excitement dream film told from constantly shifting perspectives, and a cool, dizzying trip into a genre defined through violently conflicting emotions.
John Esther(The Dissolve): The pellicle rarely maintains an image for again than a few seconds. Everything fust be rapid, colorful and artsy, bound it is an intellectual sham.
Ryan Gilbey(New Statesman): I knew I'd ceased caring, yet, when Dan started wielding a sledgehammer in his flashy and my only concern was whether that was a supporting wall he was through to knock down.
Rich Cline(Contactmusic.com): Deliberately disorienting, this courtly Belgian horror movie will delight fans of Italian giallo considered in the state of it finds an odd emotional kinsman even though the surreal plot not at any time quite comes into focus.
Xan Brooks(Observer [UK]): Dim the lungs and light up the bong.
Charlotte O’Sullivan(This is London): I was bored to tears (of a matter-of-fact hue).
Glenn Heath Jr.(Little White Lies): Gone is any semblance of narrative, replaced by a ramshackle psychodrama that takes a basic set out (man looking for his missing wife) and fragments off into multiple giallo-infused threads.
Tara Brady(Irish Times): Greatest Freudian Hits. Played it may be a little too loud.
MaryAnn Johanson(Flick Filosopher): A teeth-grindingly, temper-boilingly infuriating cinematic trial that's like an art school film project gone horribly obliquely.
Virginie Svy(Electric Sheep): An radical-sensuous, hypnotic trip through dark desires and the disturbing, grateful lines between pleasure and pain, frenzy and sanity, dream and reality.
Leslie Felperin(Guardian): This hyperstylised horripilation thriller plays like a feature-long duration advert for a perfume that would aroma like tuberose, leather and rotting nourishment, with top notes of fake kindred and old cheese.
Katherine McLaughlin(ViewLondon): Sexual fantasies and the fill with dressing of nightmares come together in this disorientating, incentive and exquisitely crafted journey through 1970s Euro-hatred and sexploitation.

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Jamie Marks Is Dead

Monday, September 1st, 2014 11:09

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Reviews:
Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): "Jamie Marks Is Dead" admirably refuses to fashion to conventional horror tropes and is acted with integrity by its young performers, but the film nonetheless has a nagging beating problem.
Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): Temperate in vigor but screaming with subtext, "Jamie Marks Is Dead" climbs too proud for the current glut of supernaturally inclined collation by dint of a hushed unease that permeates almost every frame.
Aaron Hillis(Village Voice): The thin skin uses its phantasmagoric conceit, a morbid-hued poetry, and eerie sound design to model metaphors for closeted homoeroticism and depressed unfulfillment.
Elizabeth Weitzman(New York Daily News): Writer-monitor Carter Smith got his start like a successful fashion photographer. But you wouldn't perceive it from the murky look of this generic thriller.
Dennis Harvey(Variety): The potentially odd story is handled artfully enough in the present life to cast an eerie but not along-putting spell throughout, though the ultimate point is more than a tad murky, and the desired poignancy doesn't to the full come across.
John DeFore(Hollywood Reporter): A open, psychologically savvy take on YA beyond the powers of nature fare.
Avi Offer(NYC Movie Guru): Unpredictable, of the atmosphere and enigmatic. This isn't your average coming-of-age film which makes it every one of the more refreshing, unique and un-Hollywood.
Chris Bumbray(JoBlo’s Movie Emporium): A nifty small sleeper in the vein of DONNIE DARKO.
Susan Wloszczyna(RogerEbert.com): It is pleasing to test the patience of sundry viewers.
Brian Tallerico(Film Threat): It's a pellicle that I liked more when in ~ degree one was speaking, getting into the atmosphere of this world without having to deal with the awkward plotting within it.
Sean Means(Salt Lake Tribune): Writer-manager Carter Smith sets a brooding, cool atmosphere, but he also writes opaquely dim dialogue and includes in a subplot involving Adam's generatrix (Liv Tyler) that goes nowhere.
Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): Cameron Smith finds release in Jamie Marks Is Dead, some unconventional paranormal story about accepting destruction and moving on – no matter in what condition the road ahead is paved.
Fr. Chris Carpenter(Rage Monthly): It is strange for a film to be creepy, sexy and profoundly moving, all at the same time. Filmmaker Carter Smith walks an impressive high wire act. (Interview through Smith included.)

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The Single Moms Club

Sunday, August 31st, 2014 07:08

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Reviews:
David Hiltbrand(Philadelphia Inquirer): The intellectual here is that no challenge is insurmountable whether or not you form a club. And continue a wine opener handy.
Peter Keough(Boston Globe): In Tyler Perry's latest opus, "The Single Moms Club," he demonstrates in what plight disparate stereotypes can find common found through the power of a ingenuous clich
Jordan Hoffman(New York Daily News): [T]his is a pellicle about catharsis and camaraderie, not dialectics. reasoning.
Amy Nicholson(L.A. Weekly): This is How Stella Got Her Groove Back on the side of the Pop-Tart crowd, a wish-fulfillment weepie that narrowly clears Perry's reduced bar, thanks mostly to Wendi McLendon-Covey and Cocoa Brown
Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): Mr. Perry's latest pellicle touches upon some recognizable and realistic challenges by efficient compassion, but there's in likelihood more dramatic tension in a car lake than in this film's pile of predicaments.
Chris Nashawaty(Entertainment Weekly): Just wondering, otherwise than that if these sisters are indeed qualified of doing it for themselves being of the cl~s who the film insists, why can't at minutest one of them do it independently of a man?
Michael Dequina(TheMovieReport.com): The en~ not only succinctly sums up the basic lay down beforehand, but the totality of Perry's disclosure of it.
Marjorie Baumgarten(Austin Chronicle): We see very little of the women's vicissitudes, or the ways in that they support one another through their bludgeon.
Susan Granger(SSG Syndicate): A contrived, formulaic, heavy-handed melodrama about camaraderie and the rate of female solidarity.
Radheyan Simonpillai(NOW Toronto): This is the third feature within a year (on highest part of two TV shows) to tend hitherward out of Perry's thoughtless food, drive-thru productions. So it's not remarkable that the Single Moms Club feels like it was slapped simultaneously by someone who is ready to take the nearest order.
Nathan Rabin(The Dissolve): [...]Single Moms Club cannot meet together up the energy to be as insulting and offensive [or] as overtly, aggressively sexist in the same manner with most of Perry's films [end the film] feels suspiciously like a glorified steer for a television show[...]
Kevin Carr(7M Pictures): It's sincere terrible at times. However, it's not closely as awful as his two features that came completely last year.
Sheila O’Malley(RogerEbert.com): "The Single Moms Club" is almost good.
Todd Gilchrist(ScreenCrush): A stacked beautify of one-dimensional demonstrations of offspring-bearing oppression, explored – and overcome – with Perry's typically well-intentioned no more than misguided notions of empowerment, 'The Single Moms Club' ranks among the filmmaker's worst operate yet.
Rick Bentley(Fresno Bee): Perry tosses in comedic moments at the time the tension gets too intense, ~-end he doesn't do it at the interest of any of the characters. This is a movie respecting five interesting — and funny — women traffic with real world problems.

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